Federal Judge Orders Halt To Florida Tech Censorship Bill

As conservatives take one step forward against big tech censorship, they are forced two steps backwards. 

Thanks to Governor Ron DeSantis, Florida adopted legislation that would help ensure free speech online in the state. The legislation would open the window for citizens and political candidates to sue tech tyrants for the suppression of ideas on their platforms. 

This comes amid a massive purge of conservatives online. Platforms often ban, bully and suppress those with ideas that differ from their own. Most notably President Donald Trump was banned from virtually all major social media services while he still held office. 

These Florida provisions however might be short lived as a federal court judge ordered the  rule to be halted. 

The Daily Caller reported, A federal judge delivered a major setback to a recently-passed Florida law touted by Gov. Ron DeSantis and aimed at stopping Big Tech censorship of conservatives.

Judge Robert Hinkle, of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida, ruled that the law signed by DeSantis last month violated the First Amendment in a decision delivered Wednesday evening. Hinkle ordered Florida not to enforce the legislation, which was set to go into effect on Thursday, until a final ruling is issued.

Hinkle wrote in the order that “Balancing the exchange of ideas among private speakers is not a legitimate governmental interest.” Many argue that this is absolutely a governments interest when many of these tech platforms receive massive amounts of subsidies from the federal government as well as numerous liability protections.

“It is also subject to strict scrutiny because it discriminates on its face among otherwise-identical speakers,” the judge added. 

Hinke allegedly went on to ask lawyers representing Florida if they had “ever seen a more poorly written law” according to an organization that participated in the hearing.

A spokesperson for Ron DeSantis said that their intent is to immediately appeal the decision in the 11th circuit court.